Roles of Monsters: Hard vs Soft

In the Roles of Monsters series of articles, I’ve often talked about how this role works with that role, or examples of monsters that fit into multiple categories. As you develop your lineup of monsters, you want to consider how these monsters fit into these, because that affects how you design your map. The issue here is that a monster might not fit one role as well as another. So for the purposes of putting together a lineup of monsters, I think of a sliding scale; if a monster fits well into a roll, it’s a hard example of that role. If it fits to a degree, but isn’t that great at it then it’s a soft example. I like to use these terms, hard and soft, to describe how well a monster fits into these roles. And of course, if a monster doesn’t work in a particular role at all, then it just doesn’t fit and you can’t use either of those terms. You can use this system to plan out your lineup of monsters to see what you can use and where you can use them.

Now for some examples of this application. Take the Vore; it’s a really good turret, that much is evident in how its attack works and how it moves. That’s what it’s designed for, and it excels in that role. So, it’s a hard turret. Another thing is that because it’s good at getting your attention because of that attack and because it eats more damage than many other monsters in the game, it could conceivably be used as a tank. However, it’s not as good at being a tank, because it doesn’t have any way of mitigating the damage it takes and because it’s a sitting duck, so it’s a soft tank. The Ogre, as well, is a bit of a soft turret and a soft tank, because its bouncing grenades take your attention and are hard to avoid if they’re placed above you (which they often are in Quake). You can analyze any monster like this (though some, like Hexen’s Stalker, are really tricky to classify).

The one term I don’t really like hearing is the soft shocker. What is a soft shocker? If we look at the terms as we’ve laid them out, it’s a monster that can work to surprise the player back into higher-pace gameplay, but not amazingly well. By that definition, any monster you don’t like to fight is a soft shocker. The Mancubus from Doom is a soft shocker, the Gorilla from Hard Reset is a soft shocker, and any heavy would be a soft shocker. It’s really general, and it’s the most subjective thing I can think of, so I prefer to throw that right out the window.

The term kamikaze is more of a modifier for an existing monster than a role in and of itself. A soft kamikaze can’t exist because the monster is either a kamikaze or it isn’t. You could argue that Red Faction: Armageddon’s Berserker is a soft kamikaze because it doesn’t charge at you and explode immediately, but it still is considered a kamikaze because it has that ability. For the purposes of creating a lineup of monsters, soft kamikaze doesn’t help you one bit; if you want a kamikaze in a specific place, you want one that explodes immediately. If you place a “soft” kamikaze, you’re placing it because of the other talents it brings to the table.

Another major point is fodder. Most of the time, fodder is just fodder. Almost any monster can be made into fodder by placing it in a situation the monster doesn’t quite work in. For example, the Teleport Dropper in Quake 4 was basically fodder because it was placed so poorly, in situations where the player can kill it quickly before it can do anything. Swarmers especially, by just placing individual swarmers and not allowing them to gang up on the player, you make them fodder by taking away what makes them threatening. Because of this, you can’t consider hard or soft fodder. The term mostly indicates that the monster lacks any ability as a tank, support, swarmer, shocker, etc.. However, for reasons I outlined in the fodder article, they’re still very important.

Of course, most of this is without saying. It’s mostly a set-up for another article, where it would be helpful for me to have defined these terms in advance. However, it should still be helpful to those putting together lineups of monsters for the first time, as they’re now given a logical process to follow. A decent portion of the time in the Doom modding community, when new modders add custom monsters to a project, they just take something that looks cool and add it with little regard for how it really in relation to the others in the lineup. Hopefully this and the aforementioned other article will help out with this.

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